• Sun-05-2024
South Asian believers become full partners in missionary work (May 23, 2024, Baptist Press)

“We need to be catalysts. We need to train nationals so that they own the task,” Campbell said. “We help churches raise up leaders that can plant more churches. We walk alongside them, we train them, we give them the vision.”

  • Sun-05-2024
Capuchin Missions in the Medieval Nepal (May 6, 2024, China Christian Daily)

In the 18th century, Capuchin missionaries arrived in Nepal and served for 54 years in the Kathmandu valley. They were the earlier Christian missionaries after Jesuit missionaries in the history of Nepal. They were the first missionaries to establish churches in Nepal. However, after Prithivi Narayan Shah conquered the kingdoms of the valley in 1769 AD, missionaries were forced to leave the country due to concerns about foreign imperialism and the changing political situation.

  • Sun-05-2024
How can the church respond to the needs of vulnerable children in every nation of the world? (March 12, 2024, Evangelical Focus)

A world without orphans is the value of the eternity, and values need to be grounded there. In addition, Christians should build an instinct of perspective, rather than expectancy. Christian life is a different point of view to the world, not just an anticipation of a future development. And also, as spiritual workers among vulnerable children, there is a need to build a culture instead of just making strategies.

  • Sun-05-2024
Uplifting Motherhood in India and the Church (May 13, 2024, World Evangelical Alliance)

Studies show that 59% of urban women in Delhi awaiting childbirth suffered from antepartum depression, and 41% experienced postpartum depression after delivery. Mental health challenges like anxiety and depression afflict mothers at alarming rates, impacting their emotional wellbeing and ability to nurture their children.

  • Mon-05-2024
What constitutes hurting religious sentiments? (May 17, 2024, The Daily Star)

Thus, from the very beginning, it showed that wars in the name of religion often victimise those who are not the original target. Many vested interest groups enter into play and use the heightened emotion and blind devotion—characteristics of faith-based wars—to achieve their own narrow ends. A lesson that has been proven over and over again throughout history.

  • Mon-05-2024
Kazakhstan: Why Religion is Used in Corporate Marketing? (August 7, 2023, Central Asian Bureau for Analytical Reporting)

“Today there are 6 million of young people aged under 35, meaning that 2.1 million people are active Muslims. Just imagine how big this audience is!”

  • Sun-05-2024
Christian Education: Jesus and Chinese Culture (May 16, 2024, China Partnership Blog)

The biggest thing China lacks now is the grace of Jesus Christ. They need Jesus’s grace because people take hold of some elements of traditional Chinese culture—for example, the desire to pursue beauty and goodness—but they only follow after a shadow.

  • Sun-05-2024
Dragons and Devotion: Bridging Cultural Heritage with Christian Faith (May 20, 2024, ChinaSource Blog)

Can I display an artistic representation of a dragon dance in a home that puts Jesus at the center of its allegiance? Is there some evil spiritual influence that the mere embroidery of the dragon has over my soul and home? Does my refusal to take the artwork down show a perverseness of temper in my heart? Am I displeasing God?

  • Sun-05-2024
How I Learned to Love the CUV (May 17, 2024, ChinaSource Blog)

I have learned through shared faith and life experiences with my Chinese sisters and brothers to view the Chinese Union Version of the Bible as a faithful, elegant, and eminently readable translation (信、雅、达)—one that consistently draws me closer to my Lord.

  • Mon-05-2024
From Andrew Gih to Hudson: Documenting a Legacy of Adoption and Faith (May 3, 2024, ChinaSource Blog)

“I saw your family on television last night!” I was not expecting to hear these words from a coworker who had just come to breakfast at our hotel in Hong Kong where we were attending a conference. It was June 2011. How did my family end up on television in Hong Kong?